Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in Youth: red flag for psychological issues

psychological issues(mental health): Engaging in repetitive and ritualistic behaviors is a component of typical child development. Fifty percent of mental illness begins by age 14, and three-quarters begins by age 24.
Mental Health

How do you know if someone is struggling with mental health?
There are several factors that contribute to the development of depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and other disorders in teens and adolescents. It’s important to know what signs and symptoms to look for. Below are many signs that may indicate your adolescent or teen is struggling and needs help.
Ø Angry outbursts or inappropriate anger
Ø Panic attacks
Ø Excessive anxiety or worry
Ø difficulty concentrating
Ø difficulty making transitions
Ø extremely happy or high energy at times
Ø Talking very fast
Ø Being easily overwhelmed
Ø Depressed mood – changes in weight or appetite
Ø Feelings of worthlessness, emptiness, or guilt
Ø Intense emotions
Ø Mood swings
Ø Feels simply criticized or rejected
Ø Impaired school performance
Ø Distorted sense of self
Ø Missing school due to symptoms
However, behaviors that develop into obsessive and compulsive symptoms (OCS) may represent a red flag for serious psychiatric conditions. Researchers at the lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman school of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found children and young adults with OCS who conjointly admitted to having bad thoughts were more probably to also experience psychopathology, including depression and suicide. This is the first and largest study examining OCS in additional than 7,000 participants aged 11 to 21.
The findings were published online last month in the Journal of American Academy of child and Adolescent psychiatry.
While engaging in repetitive and ritualistic behavior could be a part of childhood development, a new study now says that behaviors that develop into obsessive and compulsive symptoms (OCS) might represent a red flag for serious psychiatric conditions.
Researchers divided OCS into four categories: bad thoughts, repeating/checking, symmetry, and cleaning/contamination. Over 20 % of youth admitted to having bad intrusive thoughts, including thoughts about harming oneself or others, picturing violent images or fears that one would do something bad without intending to. These children were additional seemingly to develop serious psychopathology on the far side obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), including depression and suicide.
The study found that quite 20 per cent of youth admitted to having bad intrusive thoughts, including that about picturing violent pictures, harming one or others, or fear that one would do something bad without intending to.
Experts said these were the children who were more likely to develop serious psychopathology on the far side obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), including depression and suicide.
OCS was common in individuals who didn't seek mental health treatments (38.2 percent). Only 3 % met the threshold for OCD. OCS was a lot of common in females and after puberty. The researchers suggest OCS could also be a window for clinicians to probe and establish serious psychiatric conditions.
Speaking about the study, the principal investigator Raquel Gur, MD, PhD, director of the LiBI and a professor of psychiatry, Neurology and Radiology in the Perelman school of medicine, said that their hope is that these results will propel mental state professionals to probe for these symptoms throughout their patients’ visits as they'll be vital for distinctive adolescents who are on a downwards spiral towards psychological issues.
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